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Master Facility Plan

COLERAIN ELEMENTARY 



NWLSD CLASSROOMS AND LEARNING SPACES


OUR FACILITIES & SPACES    

Our aging facilities have learning spaces that were built for 19th Century instruction. The classrooms are small and limit the types of classroom activities students can engage in. These spaces do not permit flexible seating for group collaboration nor different types of hands-on-learning activities. 

Similar to how technology has changed the manufacturing assembly line, there is also a need to update class room spaces to allow students to have adequate space to engage in collaborative learning.  This will provide an opportunity to engage in collaborative activities that build deeper higher-level communication and critical thinking skills. Additionally, it will offer an opportunity to incorporate technology and the flexibility needed for 21st Century instruction.


UNDERSTANDING NWLSD'S NEED:


WARM, SAFE & DRY


In 2019, NWLSD assessed how much it would cost to patch existing buildings in order to keep each building WARM, SAFE AND DRY based on their current condition.
 
The overall assessment of the cost to fix identified issues in each building in order to keep outside elements like wind and rain out of each building. It includes repairs needed for windows, roofs, building envelopes, parking lots, HVAC, plumbing and electrical systems.

These costs would be the start of an ongoing repair cycle, until additional funds are acquired for future renovation or replacement. See photos below of leaking ceilings and cracked walls.


See Chart Below 

UNDERSTANDING THE STATE'S ASSESSMENT OF NWLSD'S BUILDINGS



The chart below summarizes an overview of the State's Building Assessment:
SCHOOLYEAR BUILTEDUCATIONAL VIABILITYRENOVATE / REPLACE %STATE RECOMMENDS REPLACEMENTWARM, SAFE & DRY
Colerain Elementary School192347%91%YES$0*
Colerain Middle School193046%82%YES$0*
White Oak Middle School196149%84%YES$2,664,338
Colerain High School196456%78%YES$11,328,529
Houston Early Learning Center196654%88%YES$4,206,045
Pleasant Run Middle196951%71%YES$3,804,858
Northwest High School197253%78%YES$12,560,774
Monfort Heights Elementary199973%52%
$2,755,236
Struble Elementary School2018100%-
$44,033
Taylor Elementary School2018100%-
$44,033
Pleasant Run Elementary School2018100%-
$44,033





TOTAL COST:
$40 MILLION IN DEFERRED MAINTENANCE
* CES & CMS were slated for replacement in the 2014 Master Plan.  Therefore, there are no maintenance funds assigned.
In 2021, The State of Ohio sent out an assessment of the remaining Colerain Elementary in 1923Colerain Elementary was built in 1923 (pictured above). The building is 100 years old and is still being utilized today. The facility is also not handicap accessible making it difficult for disabled students and community members to access our gymnasium, classrooms and media center.buildings within the District. They assessed our buildings for two things: renovation v replacement needs and each building’s educational viability standard.  This was their determination:

  • RENOVATION V. REPLACE: (See chart above)
When the State assesses a school building's renovation cost to be 66% or more of the replacement cost, the State recommends replacing the building with a newly constructed one. If the cost to renovate is under 66%, the State will only pay for renovation costs. The school will have to pay for everything else.  
Colerain Middle SchoolColerain Middle School is approaching 100 years old (pictured above).
Based on the findings, the State recommends replacing the following schools: Colerain Elementary, Colerain Middle, White Oak Middle School, Colerain High School, Houston Early Learning Center, Pleasant Run Middle, and Northwest High School.  
 
EDUCATIONAL VIABILITY STANDARD: (See chart above)

 This standard is determined by the State of Ohio. This number determines the measure of the building's ability to offer a sufficient learning environment: Good “natural” conditions such as lighting, air quality, temperature control, acoustics, and links to nature.  


REPLACE V. RENOVATE?


The State of Ohio recommends that NWLSD REPLACE seven buildings and renovate one based on each building’s current condition. The cost to make the recommended changes is $319 million. Like most public schools, NWLSD has a limit on the amount that can be borrowed. Currently NWLSD has a debt limit of $82 million, which would not be enough to achieve the State’s recommended replacements.
 
As a participant in the State’s ELPP Program,  the State would allow NWLSD to sell bonds (borrow) in order to acquire the necessary amount needed to achieve the State’s recommendation. Additionally, by continuing to participate in the State program,  NWLSD would earn an estimated total of $50-$60 million in ELPP credits that could be used towards an future co-funded phase.  
 

CAN NWLSD RENOVATE ALL BUILDINGS?

If NWLSD were to make the decision to renovate all eight of the buildings, the total amount would be approximately $248 million, which would exceed NWLSD’s $82 million debt limit. Making the decision to renovate all eight buildings would also eliminate NWLSD’s opportunity to earn credits in the ELPP Program and other State Programs like Classroom Facilities Assistance Program (CFAP). Both State programs assist with funding for school facilities allowing schools to borrow based on financial need. Without participating in the ELPP and CFAP programs, the State will only allow NWLSD to borrow a max of $82 million, which would not address CE, CMS and the $40 million of deferred maintenance needed for other existing buildings, leaving NWLSD with 50-100+ year old buildings and no future means of replacement for the next 30 years when Phase 1 bonds roll off.


SCHOOL BY SCHOOL


Colerain Elementary School, 100-years-old


Colerain ElementaryBased on the OSFC report, renovation of CES is about 91 percent of the cost of new construction. If OSFC estimates that renovation of a building is more than 2/3 the cost of replacing the building with a newly constructed one, it is typically recommended that the building be replaced.Given its age, the manner in which the building was constructed, CES is an obsolete building. It is no longer economically feasible to maintain CES. The school has outdated plumbing, ventilation, electrical, which are all costly to maintain and cannot accommodate today’s technology and educational needs let alone the needs of the future. It is not prudent to continue to put costly repairs into a building that is obsolete.

Constructed in 1923, it is both undersized and outdated. The electrical system for the facility is inadequate. The facility is equipped with a non-compliant security system. The building has a non-compliant manual fire alarm system. The facility has a fire suppression system. The facility is also not handicap accessible making it difficult for disabled students and community members to access our gymnasium, classrooms and media center. (2009 - Click here to read State Assessment)

Colerain Middle School, 93-years-old


Colerain Middle SchoolBased on the OSFC report, renovation of CMS is about 82 percent of the cost of new construction. If OSFC estimates that renovation of a building is more than 2/3 the cost of replacing the building with a newly constructed one, it is typically recommended that the building be replaced.

Given its age, the manner in which the building was constructed, CMS is an obsolete building. It is no longer economically feasible to maintain CMS. The school has outdated plumbing, ventilation, electrical, which are all costly to maintain and cannot accommodate today’s technology and educational needs let alone the needs of the future. It is not prudent to continue to put costly repairs into a building that is obsolete.

Constructed in 1930, it is both undersized and outdated.

Pleasant Run Middle School, 54-years-old


Based on the OSFC report, renovation of PRMS is about 71 percent of the cost of new construction. If OSFC estimates that renovation of a building is more than 2/3 the cost of replacing the building with a newly constructed one, it is typically recommended that the building be replaced.Given its age, the manner in which the building was constructed, PRMS is an obsolete building. It is no longer economically feasible to maintain PRMS. The school has outdated plumbing, ventilation, electrical, which are all costly to maintain and cannot accommodate today’s technology and educational needs let alone the needs of the future. It is not prudent to continue to put costly repairs into a building that is obsolete.


Constructed in 1969, it is both undersized and outdated.

White Oak Middle School, 62-years-old


White Oak Middle SchoolBased on the OFCC report, renovation of WOMS is about 84 percent of the cost of new construction. If OFCC estimates that renovation of a building is more than 2/3 the cost of replacing the building with a newly constructed one, it is typically recommended that the building be replaced.
 
Given its age, the manner in which the building was constructed, WOMS is an obsolete building. It is no longer economically feasible to maintain WOMS. The school has outdated plumbing, ventilation, electrical, which are all costly to maintain and cannot accommodate today’s technology and educational needs let alone the needs of the future. It is not prudent to continue to put costly repairs into a building that is obsolete.
 
Constructed in 1961, it is both undersized and outdated.

Monfort Heights Elementary, 24-years-old


Monfort Heights ElementaryBased on the OSFC report, renovation of MHE is about 52 percent of the cost of new construction. If OSFC estimates that renovation of a building is more than 2/3 the cost of replacing the building with a newly constructed one, it is typically recommended that the building be replaced.Monfort Heights falls below the build new threshold but is past half-life based on the OSFC data. Renovations now will extend through the replacement of critical systems such as HVAC and provide a critical upgrade to the learning environment providing equity among all district elementary schools.

Northwest High School, 52-years-old


Colerain Middle SchoolBased on the OSFC report, renovation of NWHS is about 78 percent of the cost of new construction. If OSFC estimates that renovation of a building is more than 2/3 the cost of replacing the building with a newly constructed one, it is typically recommended that the building be replaced. NWHS is above the threshold and is past half-life based on the OSFC data.
Construction: 1972, 1973, 1999
Total square ft: 195,948
Grades: 9-12
Current Enrollment/ Capacity : 899 / 1175-1300
Renovations/Replacement Ratio: 78%*
*State assessed for replacement

Status of the previous properties owned by the district:

  • Pleasant Run Elementary (PRE) - NWLSD still owns this property, which is located on Hamilton Ave. As we consider options for Phase 2 of the Master Facility Plan, the vacant lot could be a possible site for a new Pleasant Run Middle School.
  • Welch Elementary School -  This property was sold in 2019.
  • Bevis Elementary - This property is in the process of being sold
  • Ann Weigel Elementary - This property is located on Banning Rd. It is still owned by NWLSD. In 2022, a portion of the building was demolished. The remainder of the property is being utilized as the Central Supports Office and secondary alternative programs.  Plans will be put in place for this building to be sold in the future.
  • White Oak Middle School - White Oak (WOM) is currently being utilized as a functioning school location. However, in Phase 2 of the Master Facility Plan, NWLSD will combine three middle schools into two middle school locations in order to achieve operational efficiency. As a result WOM would be closed. 

MASTER FACILITY PLAN: PHASE I (COMPLETE)


In November of 2015, Northwest Local School District voters approved a bond and operating levy which enabled the district to initiate Phase I of a three-phased facilities plan designed to address the aging facilities throughout the District and to provide ALL students with modern educational spaces that are conducive to learning and that provide a safe and secure environment.
 
The 2015 combination levy/bond resulted in the construction of three new schools and the closure/demolition of Welch, old Pleasant Run Elementary, old Struble Elementary, and old Taylor Elementary. Additionally, we closed Weigel Elementary School and demolished previously closed Bevis - All WITHOUT RAISING TAXES!
 
Ribbon-cutting ceremonies for the three new elementary schools (Taylor, Pleasant Run, and Struble) were held in August of 2018.
The schools all featured (2018):
    > Secure vestibules
    > Building security systems
    > High-efficiency HVAC systems that improve air quality
    > ELA (Extended Learning Areas)
    > Brightly colored spaces maximizing natural lighting
    > Maker Spaces
    > Improved acoustics and furniture that benefit student comfort
    > Improved kitchen facilities providing more lunch options for students    
Photos of the 2018 Buildings:
The three newer elementary schools have Extended Learning Areas where they can gather simultaneously to learn and participate in interdisciplinary, STEM and small group activities